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www.anastasia-england.me.uk 2015-2018

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CAMPAIGN PENSION 60 MEN & WOMEN. INCREASED STATE PENSION

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MICHAEL THOMPSON - PENSION CAMPAIGNER FOR OVER 30 YEARS

PENSION MONEY PETITION  

Stand up for our Grandparents. Increase the State pension

for our elderly people.

 

CLICK HERE TO READ AND SIGN AND SHARE THANKS

 

No old person should have to endure hypothermia related illness due to lack of heating.

No old person should have to go hungry because of lack of food.

INCREASED STATE PENSION All Pensioner Ages

Pensioner Bus Pass Blog corbyn equalise pension 60 men and women 1993

WE ARE NOT AN AGEING SOCIETY - WE ALL AGE - LIFE IS 100 PER CENT FATAL UK DID NOT HAVE A BABY BOOM 1950s - 1960s

 

The UK had a “post-war bulge”, not a baby boom:

 

The two World Wars were both followed by short sharp surges in live births soon after demobilisation of the men who had been conscripted to fight. The children born after the First World War in the 1920 surge were, as it turned out, destined to fight in the Second. Then, after victory in 1945, those who survived were able to return home to start their own families.

 

Thankfully, those who were born in that second 1946/1947 surge never had to be conscripted and were able to spread their family-building over a longer period, but nonetheless the concentration was enough to cause a further bump in the birth rate in the 1960s.  

 

To underline this interpretation, ...charts show the numbers of men and women being demobilised from the Armed Forces in 1945 and 1946, and births in England and Wales in the final years of that decade.

 

That there was a lag of about three quarters (nine months) between demobilisation and maternal deliveries shouldn’t come as a surprise.  

 

Nor should the drop in births in the last two quarters of 1945.

 

This reflected the lower number of young males present in the UK after D Day in June 1944.

 

The UK experience was not the same as that of the United States which did have a sustained “baby boom”.

 

SOURCE CLICK HERE

WHY £200 PER WEEK STATE PENSION IN PETITION?

 

National Pensioners Convention inform this is pensioner survival threshold in 2017, as does the pension industry.

 

WHICH MAGAZINE  -

PENSIONER COUPLES NEED £18,000 A YEAR

 

(Research Which members February 2017)

Retired couples need £18,000 a year to cover household essentials – such as food, utilities, transport and housing costs –

rising to £26,000 allowing for extra treats, such as a short-haul holidays and some leisure activities. ...

 

The results come from a survey of more than 1,500 retired couples, who shared their spending behaviour with Which?.

 

Read more: http://www.which.co.uk/news/2017/04/revealed-how-much-you-need-to-save-for-a-happy-retirement/ - Which?

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MY PETITION

 

INCREASED STATE PENSION

£200 per week state pension.

 https://you.38degrees.org.uk/p/pension60now 

 

WHAT IS BEING ASKED?

- Upgrading state pension to £200 for all pensioner ages

with full National Insurance record.reducing back down to 30 years NI history instead of 35 as now.

 

- £5000 more tax allowance from 60

 

- Housewife / married woman stamp state pension

increased from 60 to 70 per cent

for the partner without the full National Insurance record.

 

 

FUNDED by:

-  increasing from 2 to 3 per cent worker National Insurance contributions on the rich earning £80,000 and above, on all further salary.

 

- the boss pays more on worker with £80,000 salary, by

increased employer National Insurance contributions

up from 13.8 per cent now to 14.8 per cent.

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DESCRIBED AS ECONOMIC MURDER - CUTS TO ELDER SOCIAL CARE  BY TORY GOVERNMENT

CAUSED 120,000 EXCESS DEATHS

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PENSIONER POVERTY ON THE RISE AGAIN

(Source Silver Voices Briefing

17 September 2017)

 

If you were to believe the national media, senior citizens have never had it so good and are living in the lap of luxury with gold-plated pensions! Latest Age UK research explodes this myth and shows that pensioner poverty is rising sharply. Of course, there is a minority of rich pensioners, just as there is a minority of rich youngsters or rich middle-aged people. But poverty in old age remains a major problem and a significant cause of premature death.

 

The research reveals that the number of pensioners living below the poverty line rose to 1.9 million last year, an increase of almost 20% in a year. One million of these are regarded to be in "severe poverty". And nearly 3 million over 65s find life a struggle financially.

 

Latest Government figures back up the Age UK research, indicating that about 800,000 pensioners are living in 'material deprivation', unable even to afford the basics of life. Official statistics reveal that:

 

Over a million senior citizens would be unable to meet an unexpected expense of only £200

708,800 are unable to keep their homes damp-free

572,000 are unable to keep their homes warm

286,000 are unable to pay regular bills

1,299,600 have no access to a car and can't afford a taxi

 

Poverty in later life is particularly acute amongst the over 80s. Age UK research indicates that 19% of all 80-84 year olds and 21% of the over 85s are in poverty (the comparative figure for 65-69 year olds is 13%). Senior citizens who are single or who rent their homes are also at increased risk of living in poverty.  

 

The poverty problem is compounded by the low take-up rate of benefit entitlements amongst senior citizens. 38% of UK pensioners who are entitled to pension credit do not claim it and 15% of eligible pensioners do not claim housing benefit.

 

A total of £3.5 billion of pension credit and housing benefit goes unclaimed by pensioners each year. There are many reasons for the low take-up rate which include: lack of knowledge of entitlements, complexity of the application process and reluctance to claim the 'social security' out of pride and dignity. This shows the importance of 'universal' benefits such as bus passes, winter fuel payments and free TV licences in tacking pensioner poverty.